The German Clues to the Lost Dutchman Gold Mine.

Jacob Waltz and the directions he gave to his Lost Dutchman Gold Mine.
It is a recorded fact that Jacob Waltz, the “Dutchman” tried to give directions or clues to two friends, Julia Thomas and Rhinehart Petrasch, in an attempt to lead them to his rich gold mine in the Superstition Mountains of Arizona.

When Jacob Waltz lost his home in the Great Phoenix flood of February 1891, he moved into Phoenix and rented room, board and laundry services from Julia Thomas. Shortly after, he began to talk to Julia Thomas and another boarder at the Thomas house, Rhinehart Petrasch, about a rich gold mine he had in the Superstition Mountains 40 miles east of Phoenix. He promised to take Julia and Rhiney to the mine as soon as the hot Arizona summer was behind them.

Old Waltz told Julia and Rhiney his mine was in a terribly rough and remote part of the Superstition Mountains and would be difficult for anyone to find. In 1891 there were very few place names in the 
Jacob Waltz 
Superstitions that Waltz could reference to help guide someone to a particular location. To make matters worse, Waltz spoke heavy German while both Julia and Rhiney were not completely fluent with the German language, so most of what Julia and Rhiney remembered were directions Waltz gave in the German language.

Jacob Waltz suddenly took sick in the early fall of 1891 and died on October 25th of that year without being able to take Julia and Rhiney to his gold mine. Neither Julia nor Rhiney were schooled in mining or living out in the wilds so they sent a letter to Rhiney’s father and brother in Montana to come to Phoenix and help them search for old Waltz’s mine. In the summer of 1892 Julia Thomas, Rhiney Petrasch, Gottfreid Petrasch and Hermann Petrasch went into the Superstition Mountains to find the mine of Jacob Waltz.

They stayed in the mountains for two months in the heat of summer before giving up and returning to Phoenix. Jacob Waltz had been correct, his mine was in such rough and remote country that finding it would be a stroke of luck for someone
.
Herman Petrasch sat down with Julia and Rhiney and had them tell him everything they remembered Waltz saying about his mine. Julia and Rhiney related as best they could what Waltz told them over the span of several months concerning his mine. The things Julia and Rhiney agreed on were kept as good clues by Hermann and the things they disagreed on, he discarded.

None of these directions helped Hermann Petrasch locate Waltz’s mine. There are other clues or directions that Waltz gave to two acquaintances, Dick Holmes and Gideon Roberts, and some of those clues match a few of the clues Waltz gave to Julia and Rhiney. 

Someday someone may stumble across old Waltz’s mine but it will be more good fortune than detective work. The mine is most probably as Waltz said, in terribly rough, rugged country. And if he indeed hid the entrance, by now, time and the growth of grass and brush, cactus and trees have hidden the mine so completely it would be impossible to distinguish from the rest of the landscape. It will take a keen eye, and a lot of luck to solve the puzzle of the Lost Dutchman Gold Mine.

Here are the clues given in German as remembered by Julia and Rhiney, and in the best English interpretation of the things Julia and Rhiney remembered Waltz saying.
 
The clues are in no certain order and the German is written the way Julia and Rhiney remembered it, not as it is literally correct grammatically.

“Sie liegt uber de Salz fluss bergen.”
It is in those Salt River Mountains. (today known as the Superstition Mountains).
“Ich kreuze der grunen fluss unten am ein fort.”
I cross the green river below the fort. (probably the Verde River below Ft. McDowell)
“Ich mache lager ubernacht in der cottonwood wassenlauf.”
I make an overnight camp in a cottonwood wash.”
‘Ich kreuze der Salz fluss an der felsenseichter.”
I cross the Salt River at the rocky shallow. (today known as Mormon Flat). 
“Ich folge das ? dem suden zu.”
I follow it’s  ?  to the south.  (probably trail)
“Verlasse das wasser an der quelle.”
Leave the water at the spring.
“Benutze der indianer weg der da folgt.”
Follow the Indian trail that leaves there.” (leaves the spring)
“Drei ? ron der quelle wirst du mein spitzfelsen finden.”
Three  ?  from the spring you find a spire. (it is not clear if Waltz meant miles or kilometers)
“Dort oben wirst du sas Mexicaniscle lager finden.”
Up there you will find the Mexican camp.
“Von meiner lagerstatte wen du im sattel sitz kannst du in ferne im suden durch ein loch vom Berg sehen.”
From my camp in the saddle you will see a peak in the distance to the south with a hole.
“Zu dem westen kannst du den sehen.”
To the west you will see another peak.
 “Mein miene ist nordlich aber ohne mich wirst du sie nicht finden.”
My mine is to the north but you cannot find it without me.” (north of Waltz’s camp)


“Die miene ist gut versteckt rom auge.”
The mine is well hidden from sight.
“Ich grub zwei eigene locher.”
I dug two of my own. (caches)
“Keine sind in sicht von einander und keine sind weit voneinander.”
None are within sight of each other and none are far from each other. (caches)
“Von der hohle kannst du sie alle sehen.”
From the cave you can see all of them.  (caches)
“Komme riemals zuruck der selbe weg.”
Never return by the route you arrived.
“Die indianer haben mich einmal umstellt, Ich war gezwungen mein lager schnell zu verlassen.”
The Indians saw me there once, I had to leave my camp quickly.
“Ich versteckte die miene genau so wie die Mexicaner.”
I hid the mine like the Mexicans.
“Die Mexicaner lageren oben.”
The Mexicans camp above. 
“Ich versteckte die werkzeuge ober den sattle.”
I hid my tools above the saddle.
“Schav fur die felsenspitze die Mexicaner benutzten die felsenspitze al sein anhaltspunkt.”
Look for the spire, the Mexicans used the spire(s) as their marker(s). 
“Ein hoher berg steht zu dem osten.”
A high mountain is to the east.
“Ein tiefes tal lieft zu dem wester.”
A low valley lies to the west.
“Ich benutzte zwei von den Mexicaner lochern.”
I used two of the Mexican holes.  (caches or mines?)
None of these directions helped Hermann Petrasch locate Waltz’s mine. There are other clues or directions that Waltz gave to two acquaintances, Dick Holmes and Gideon Roberts, and some of those clues match a few of the clues Waltz gave to Julia and Rhiney.
 
Someday someone may stumble across old Waltz’s mine but it will be more good fortune than detective work. The mine is most probably as Waltz said, in terribly rough, rugged country. And if he indeed hid the entrance, by now, time and the growth of grass and brush, cactus and trees have hidden the mine so completely it would be impossible to distinguish from the rest of the landscape. It will take a keen eye, and a lot of luck to solve the puzzle of the Lost Dutchman Gold Mine.


The History of a Texas Outlaw


“An outlaw can be defined as somebody who lives outside the law, beyond the law and not necessarily against it.”

The Texas outlaws of old, many of whom spent time as lawmen themselves. Some criminals are just that: criminals. Some, however, were a little more complicated. Here is one of the most notorious Texas outlaws.

Perhaps the most baffling Texas outlaw was James Brown Miller, one of the most notorious Texas outlaws, known as both “Killer Miller” and “Deacon Jim”. Miller regularly attended the Methodist church, and neither smoke nor drank. The teachings of the church must have fallen short for Miller since he was a known assassin and had been arrested for murder several times, including for the murder of his grandparents and his brother in law. For protection, Miller always wore a large black coat with an iron plate sewn into the breast.
Miller served as the Marshall of Pecos, Texas, as well as a Texas Ranger. He didn’t earn those titles by being a 


James Brown Miller (1866-1909)... a Texas outlaw of old
repentant man who changed his ways, but rather by being a scheming man who realized that obscuring his past could get him into positions of influence.

The man who lives by the sword dies by the sword, however, and in 1909, Jim “Killer” Miller was lynched by an angry mob who were fearful that he would evade justice for the murder of Gus Bobbitt, an Oklahoma rancher and former Deputy U.S. Marshal. Witnesses to the hanging said Miller shouted “Let ‘er rip!” and jumped off his hanging platform voluntarily.


Buckshot Roberts Defeats Billy the Kid's Entire Gang by Himself

Andrew "Buckshot" Roberts is probably best known for killing Charlie Sheen while taking a dump in Young Guns. The actual story of that day is no less amazing.

You see, Billy the Kid (the famous gunfighter and co-author of Bill and Ted's history report) and his gang the Regulators had a warrant for Roberts' arrest, implicating him in the murder of a rancher named John Tunstall, whom Billy used to work for. Roberts didn't actually have anything to do with Tunstall's death, but he was a shit-kicking Texas outlaw who didn't shy away from gunfights, so when Billy and his gang staged an ambush, Roberts was more than happy to engage in a free exchange of bullets.

That's right -- rather than surrender when he realized he was surrounded by 14 Regulators (that's enough guys to field one and a half heavily armed baseball teams), Roberts instead told them all to go straight to hell.

As the battle commenced, Roberts was hit in the groin almost immediately, which would've taken the fight out of Quick Draw McGraw himself. But Roberts continued firing until his rifle was empty, wounding three Regulators and taking them out of the fight. Billy the Kid tried to take advantage of Roberts' dick wound by rushing him, but Roberts took his empty rifle and clubbed the blazing pigshit out of him.

Roberts retreated into a house to reload, where Regulator Dick Brewer (Charlie Sheen's character in the movie) tried to sneak up on him. Roberts 
Andrew "Buckshot" Roberts
spotted Brewer and blasted his head into skull-and-brains confetti. At that point, Billy the Kid decided it was way too early in the day for any more of Billy the Kid decided it was way too early in the day for any more of this bullshit and ordered his gang to beat feet, leaving Buckshot Roberts alone to bleed to death a day later. Go back and read that sentence again -- one of the most famous gunfighters in history, backed up by his entire gang, wasn't enough to bring the mortally wounded Buckshot Roberts down.

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